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Jack Frost

A myth submitted to the site by Victoria


Jack Frost
  • Jack Frost

This is the story of a boy, also about a girl, a flower, winter and a mouse. This story, dear reader, is about a boy named Jack Frost who lived in a cottage with his mother and father in a village called Yolkan. He was a tall boy for his age, with silver, white hair and pale skin. He was a sickly boy, this was beacuse his mother was ill with him in her tummy. His mother called it a tragady, a tragady that beacuse her boy was so ill she, and many others, thought Jack would die at a young age. But, reader, he did not die. This is beacuse he did not want to die, beacuse he had a strong will to live, but also because he is the main character in this story.

The story begins when Jack was walking back from the market, he was asked to get some milk, eggs and some suger. And so he was bringing them back home in a small basket. After a while, he felt a little tired and sat down below a tree with a flower next to it. A blue one which glistened in the light. A spider crept up the stem and began to make a web from the flower to the tree and Jack watched fasinated as it did so.

Then suddunly, a white mouse leaped out of the grass and bumped into Jack's leg, it squeeked in terror as it looked up to the boy and fainted there. Jack blinked and saw a fat ginger cat pounce out of the long grass, after the mouse. Jack frowned at the cat and grabbed a rock, throwing it at the cat and missing on purpose. The cat hissed and Jack threw another, yowling in fear the ginger cat scrammbled away into the grass.

The boy looked down at the mouse who was blinking and shaking, as if it had just woken from a dream. Then the mouse's ears twitched and sniffed the air, realising the cat had gone. It then turned to face Jack who looked down at the mouse smiling.

"Dear mouse," Jack said to the little creature "You can go now, I've scared away the cat and now you can leave," But the mouse didn't move, it stared up at Jack with big brown eyes. Then the mouse did something that a mouse shouldn't do, the mouse spoke to Jack, it spoke to a human.

"Human, thank you for helping me, I wish you a good life and for this I will grant you a wish, and I promise you, it shall come true," The mouse bowed low and Jack stared at it. He was not shocked, he was just surprised, a wish!

Jack thought for a moment then he said "I wish, dear little mouse, that you can look after this flower for me," And Jack pointed at the blue flower by the tree.
"Surely you want something else?" The mouse squeeked
"Like your pale skin to be gone, to be an advarge size human or to be well, to get rid of your illness?"
But Jack shook his head and just like that, the wish was granted.

Reader, you are probebly wonderering why should he be given a wish and waste it on a flower? Well reader, Jack knew winter was near, he wanted to save one picse of beauty for the winter to look at untill it was over.

And reader, the mouse did look after the flower, he protected it from harm and the coming snow. So when it came to winter, Jack returned to the tree and flower in the horrible cold gloom of the day. He was wrapped in a scarf and wore a big hat and coat which he snuggled into merrily. When he reached the tree he smiled at the flower, the mouse was standing beside it, wiping away snow from one of the petals, the flower had stayed the same.
"Thank you mouse," Jack said to the white little creature and the mouse smiled at him.
"Human, I have done as you asked, I have granted you wish, now I ask of you to grant MY wish" The mouse squeeked.
Jack nodded.
"I wish, Human, for two things, firstly, to tell me your name and secondly, to take this flower and give it to the first human girl you see and after you marry and have children, I shall return to this tree and wait for you, then you shall bring the flowers seeds and give them to me," Jack did as the mouse told him and told him his name was Jack Frost and so picked the flower and walked into the village square.

Reader, from before, you would think the mouse's wish was even stranger than Jack's. And this was true. It was indeed a strange wish. And the first girl Jack laid his eyes on was the girl from down the street to him, she had long blonde hair and big bluE eyes and a beautiful face. Not saying a word, Jack wandered up to the girl and handed her the blue flower. She smiled at him and from that day, yes reader, after that day and a few years onwards, they married and had three lovely children a boy and two girls.

So Jack returned to the very same tree he'd met the white mouse, not forgetting his promise to the small creature. And with him, he carried twenty seeds from the flower he had given to his wife when he was a boy. A it said years ago, the mouse was there, standing by the the bottom of the tree waiting for Jack to arrive.

Jack halted at the tree and crouched down to the mouse, he tipped the seeds down at the white one's feet and it sniffed them happily.
"Jack Frost," The mouse said "Now you have children, a wife you have had a long and happy life, now I must take these seeds other than on, that one I will give to you," And the mouse grabbed all the seeds other than one and leapt away into the grass.

Slowly Jack picked up the seed and suddunly it cracked open. It crack and out from it came a a wave of blue sparkles and dust that leapt up at his face, he couched and sneesed, he retched forward and collapsed to the floor.

When Jack awoke he was on a bed in his house, his wife dabbing his brow with a wet cloth and his children standing at the bottom of the bed. He wife siad that the baker had found him lying by a tree. Jack couched after she'd said this and his wife said he was very, very ill.

And, dear reader, I am sad to say, Jack died. He died in peace and happiness and the cold chill of the seed the white mouse had given to him washed over his spirit and Jack returned as a ghost, covering the land with frost and cold each winter.

Reader, you probebly think this is a very strange story, and yes, you are right, this story, however repesients a great promised. The seeds the mouse had taken away were planted and the flowers that grew out wern't blue at all, Jack had covered them with the chill of winter and they turned to a white, hanging over to the side. And so they named these flowers the snow-drop.

Reader, think of Jack Frost, think of the promises he made and what great things happened to him in the one thing he could do right. Making promises makes you do great things. It makes you happy and grand. But reader, do not promise the wrong thing. Reader, before I end this story I wish to ask you a question. And answer if you can.
Why?

By Victoria
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Showcase story administrator comments

This is the winner of the Christmas and Winter story competition, text stories, ages 12 - 16. Well done.

Your comments

Add your commentsThere are 118 comments for this story.

Latest comments:
Name: DesertSnowQueen 30th October 2014
Cute story! It was strange, but I liked it a lot. I thought the ending was a little sad, though.
Name: Connie 29th October 2014
This is a really good story.
I'd like to know when this story is created. :D
Thanks.
Name: Elsa Jane Wingstone 27th October 2014
I love it.you know,my mother has a snow drop flower also.when i look it at the window,i have a strange feeling with it.i don't know why,its just well...magic?
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